Monday, 31 December 2018

The Seven Considerations of Church Design

Upper Level Plan of Sunday School and Babe-in-arms Room

Christians agree that a church building is not God's 'temple on earth' as in the times before Christ. It is understood that God is worshiped whenever and wherever the human heart turns to Him. 


However, a church building is a uniquely important space where life memories are made. A church building is a venue where...


1. The Bible is read and explained and applied. 


2. A large extended 'family' celebrate God's demonstrated love through Jesus. 


3. An outsider is welcomed and invited to belong. 


4. The love between a man and a woman is deeply honoured with ceremony and encouragement. 


5. A new life is protected and delighted in. 


6. Life plans are discovered and commitments made. 


7. Closure (after a life is completed) begins.


At its best, a new church building is more than a 'tool for mission' like an auditorium or converted gymnasium, though it is likely to include those 'gathering' functions. 


It is a place of life's most significant moments. Those life moments are often photographed and always remembered. Think of the procession of a bride and her father.

Historic city church building adapting to the mission


Personal history can be made in the sports arena, at the university graduation hall, even at a bus stop, but it is uniformly made at church. This insists that a church building be a work of Architecture expressing positive values, hope and strong faith. 


By being an excellent building it can help create a culture of excellence in its community. Design can be seen as an act of love: "somebody cared enough to draw that...". 


A work of Architecture reflects its place in time, so a new church building will use the materials, methods and technology available at the time of construction, giving it a contemporary temperament.



"As both an informal meeting place with many functions & a venue of contemplation, formality and excellence, the tone to aim for might be described as 'quiet contemporary elegance".

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